#22 in the Judging a Photograph Series

.Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

It’s always nice to find new ideas for making photos more interesting. I do love to use frames in an image. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. This might be a tree trunk or a wall or just a dark shadow. The idea is that when someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge.

Finding Frames in Knaresborough

Knaresborough in North Yorkshire has a railway viaduct with views through the arches to charming cottages ranged up the side of the gorge. The whole town is a photographer’s paradise. There’s a castle, a river, rowing boats, a marketplace, old bridges, little snickets and cobbled alleyways, ancient architecture and rustic pubs. For photographers the main advantage is the gorge. It gives such lot of choices of different heights and angles for photos.

These photos are taken from the Mother Shipton side of the river Nidd. In June the cottages just peep out from among the willows and ivy in full leaf.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

I tried to capture this green view first of all. In the first picture above, just the edge of the arch and the dangling ivy make a soft frame. The contrast is quite low which means there is not much impression of depth.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

In this second image I used the hard frame of one arch around the whole image. It’s more striking. The sky is nice and blue because the centre of the photo is exposed correctly. It works well in black and white too, but for that I did choose to lighten the stonework. If I hadn’t, there would have been too much black overall.

Notice the little band of light across the grass in the foreground. It’s quite effective, like an underline.

I did wonder whether to brighten up the exposure to show the stonework texture of the arch, but as you can see from the shot below, it doesn’t work. It’s washed out, especially the sky. The feeling of depth is lost too. I’ve got further tips about exposing the sky – click here.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

Challenging Contrast

Contrast is usually the big decision when using something in an image to make a frame. Your framing object will probably be the darkest part of the image. It would be easiest to get the rest of the image exposed correctly and then the frame can be as dark as you like. If you like the frame itself and expose for that, then you would have to accept that the remainder of the image will perhaps become washed out.

What have you used to make frames in photos, and did you like the effect? Let me know in the comments below.

Read the previous blog in the Judging a Photograph series by clicking here.

Read the Judging a Photograph series from the start by clicking here.

Photalife

 

Disclosure: Thank you for reading this sponsored post, which helps pay for the running of this website.

#ad Top Five Business Storage Secrets for Everyone on Falcondale Life blog. Improve processes with pallet racking, computerise stock control or use external storage. Add storage between floors and improve home business storage. Warehouse racking for small and medium enterprises.

If you manage a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME), then you will already be fully aware that controlling your business costs is a big part of being profitable. For many business owners, it is the principal way they maintain a healthy balance sheet at all! However, one of the areas of expenditure that even some of the most scrupulous businesspeople fail to pay full attention to is with their storage operation.
The trouble is that there are all sorts of hidden costs that are associated with the management and running of modern storage facilities. These including things like electrical lighting and heating or cooling systems. Also rent charges, wage costs and wastage from lost or broken items. If you want to truly keep a lid on commercial expenditure, then you need to pay attention to the cost-saving storage tips outlined below.

(1) Improve Processes With Pallet Racking

By palletising your racking you will improve a number of processes rapidly. Firstly, sliding or gravitational pallet racks allow deliveries to reach their onward destination in your warehouse without effort. Secondly, you will be able to fully integrate your goods in operation to your stock control facility. This means that newly arrived deliveries can go immediately into stock without needing to opened up or split. Helping your goods in department to work more efficiently, pallet racking also means a single system for picking items, too. Pallet racking installation in in Middlesbrough and other parts of UK can be undertaken from WSSL who can advise on the best approach for your business.

Top Five Business Storage Secrets for Everyone on Falcondale Life blog. Improve processes with pallet racking, computerise stock control or use external storage. Add storage between floors and improve home business storage. Warehouse racking for small and medium enterprises.

(2) Computerising Stock Control

When items come into your storage facility they should be labelled with a bar code and scanned. This means that any item should be easy to find with a computerised scanner. If a picking operative has no idea what the item is they are looking for, their scanner will recognise the bar code and tell them. This speeds up picking times and allows for fewer errors. Furthermore, customer enquiries can be handled with a greater degree of efficiency. This is because your software should tell administrative staff what levels of stock for any given product happen to be.

(3) External Storage

When your storage facility is packed this a sure sign that you are managing costs well by running close to capacity. Nevertheless, storage rooms and warehouses which have no ‘give’ because they are almost full to bursting tend to be places where things go missing. Or things get accidentally shifted to somewhere they shouldn’t be. Rather than paying rent for an additional storage facility, make use of a shipping container in your car park. This is a cheap, temporary alternative to store items.

(4) In-Between Floors

Since many SMEs operate from out-of-town industrial parks, they often occupy double height buildings. If you do, but only make use of the floor level, then fitting a mezzanine floor to create an additional layer in your premises is a great idea. You can virtually double your available space overnight with a free-standing mezzanine. This can be disassembled when your lease is up, if needed. They are relatively quick to install by professionals companies over the course of a few days, depending on the size required.

(5) Home Storage

Just like business storage, home storage is also very important. Home offices can be made more functional if everything is organized and put on the designated places. You can consider different racks, shelving units and desk storage/filing.

Photographs and text supplied on behalf of Warehouse Storage Solutions. I’m grateful to this local enterprise for their support of my blog, Falcondale Life.

Other blog posts: Do you need to take interiors photographs for your small business? Get some interiors photography tips by clicking here.

Do you want to get started with Twitter? Get some tips by clicking here.

#21 in the Judging a Photograph Series

How to Find Meaning Within Father's Day on Falcondale Life blog. Photo: On the Edge at Wotton Under Edge, Cotswolds. Is Father's Day just an invention by a greetings card company to make money? Unlike Mothering Sunday, it's not part of the church calendar but that doesn't mean we should dismiss it as an American import. . This is the second blog in a series of two faith blogs for this week.

We’ve always looked down our noses at Father’s Day because it was invented by Hallmark Cards – or that’s the allegation, anyway. I have no evidence this is true. If it really was invented by a greetings card company then somehow it seems cheesy and not authentic. Compare it to Mothering Sunday, which is an actual part of the church calendar in Lent. And as it’s a man’s world, do Fathers really need a day?

These sneering dismissals of Father’s Day begin to fall down pretty quickly if I look closer.

In favour of Father’s Day

Firstly Father’s Day has as much right to exist in the calendar as Mothers Day. Mothering Sunday did not used to be a celebration of Mothers; I blogged about this a few months ago. The American Mother’s Day actually came first. Later it was adopted in the UK and linked into the Lent celebration of the Mother church. So we can’t honestly knock Fathers Day on the grounds it’s an American import.

Secondly the existence of Father’s Day is not an obstacle for feminists or even overstretched mums. Yes, in plenty of families it is Mum – or one parent – who is working harder at parenting than the other parent. Whatever your personal family dynamic is, you can choose WHAT you do and HOW MUCH of it you do on Mothers Day and Fathers Day as appropriate. You’ll have to justify these choices to your kids, which is no bad thing. In my family I get cards, gifts, a trip out and a day off from cooking on Mother’s Day. My husband gets cards and chocolate on Father’s Day then it’s pretty much back to normal after breakfast. More about this later.

Thirdly, just because it’s not a Christian festival like Mothering Sunday it doesn’t mean Jesus is uninterested in Father’s Day. You may or may not be interested in Jesus but that’s a separate point! In church on Mothering Sunday we give thanks for Mothers but Father’s Day doesn’t normally get a mention. I’m not suggesting we must change this but I do suggest that some Christians could think a bit more deeply about Fathers Day.

It’s not a religious festival but …

On Father’s Day this year we will take a moment to show our appreciation for Dad by writing words of love in a card. We will hug him, take him breakfast in bed and give ourselves a moment to appreciate him. We might make a special effort to be helpful and bring a bit of happiness into the day. Does this sound like the sort of thing that Jesus would do? Of course it does. Jesus must be delighted with Father’s Day.

People in the Bible frequently refer to God as Father. This helps us to understand how God sees us as his children; doting, forgiving, abundant in love. It’s hard for people who have had a difficult relationship with a Dad to get comfortable with this idea. Yet even then we know what a good Father should be like. We are hard wired as humans to appreciate a good dad and to be hurt by a bad one.

Giving hope as well as thanks

What about the very average dads? The ones who have good days and off days? Or maybe like us you have a dad who just doesn’t get home from work very much? I think these are the moments to build these dads up. Father’s Day also functions as an encouragement to dads. It says thank you for all the times you’ve been great, and we know there will be more of those times. People change when they are given hopeful messages like this.

If we invent a day or anniversary to celebrate, appreciate or encourage other people, it doesn’t matter if the original motivation was to build a greetings card empire. If there’s no love, it won’t take hold of your heart. But this year we will celebrate dads a little better in my family. I can’t think of any good reason to hold back the love.

Photo: On the edge at Wotton-Under-Edge

How to Find Meaning Within Father's Day on Falcondale Life blog. Photo: On the Edge at Wotton Under Edge, Cotswolds. Is Father's Day just an invention by a greetings card company to make money? Unlike Mothering Sunday, it's not part of the church calendar but that doesn't mean we should dismiss it as an American import. Photo: how this was shot and edited. Read blog for details.

I took this photo of my husband and children on a walk above Wotton-under-Edge. The southern ridge of the Cotswolds falls away sharply, almost like a cliff edge. This is the “edge” in the name of the town. The view towards Bristol and the Severn Estuary is long and fairly flat. When I took this photo I really wanted to show off the effect of the edge falling away and the view appearing. I use a small aperture to get it all in focus and I crouch down slightly low. This gave me the angle to get the whole vista stretching up to near the top of the frame.

When I edited the photo the top section was too bright so I used a graduated filter to dim it. Also the whole of the top half of the image has had the clarity (structure) heavily boosted. I don’t think it looks too processed but has saved a nice image.

It’s a lovely Daddy moment captured for Father’s day, with him helping the girls make friends with the horse. The edge of this horse’s field is so steep, it must be a pretty clever animal not to wonder off the edge in the dark.

I tried to take a few more photos of the sunset over the Severn estuary from the field, and the horse wondered into my shot, which was nice. If you’d like to know where this is, take a look at this walking blog. It’s the view from the bench by the Wellington Trees.

How to Find Meaning Within Father's Day on Falcondale Life blog. Photo: On the Edge at Wotton Under Edge, Cotswolds. Is Father's Day just an invention by a greetings card company to make money? Unlike Mothering Sunday, it's not part of the church calendar but that doesn't mean we should dismiss it as an American import. Photo: how this was shot and edited. Read blog for details.

Read the previous blog on the Judging a Photograph Series by clicking here.

The Judging a Photograph Series can be read from the start by clicking here.

Read more faith-based analysis by clicking here.

Photalife

 

What Tim Farron Should Have Said on Falcondale Life blog. This Christian Leader of the Liberal Democrats was asked if gay sex was wrong and he didn't give a very convincing answer. It's a very hard question because any answer will upset someone. But there's no need for him to judge. In fact that would be unwise. Opinions are one thing, judgement is another. And I think he knows Love Wins. This is a picture of the monument to William Tyndale at North Nibley. He translated the Bible into English and was matyred for it.

Tim Farron, as leader of the Liberal Democrats and a Christian, was asked if he thought gay sex is a sin. He said no – eventually. He was wrong.

What he should have said was this.

“I find the idea abhorrent. God will judge us.”

What did you say??!!??

I hope by now you are wondering where I am going with this. Because if you follow me on Twitter you will know I have a habit of retweeting Nathan Hamm, Glennon Doyle and anyone else who champions Christian love and inclusion for the LGBTQ community. (Go follow them now!)

So this is how I think Tim Farron should have continued.

“You ask me how I view this as a Christian. Well, If God is going to judge us, I certainly should not. The idea that I have any right to a judgemental opinion on consensual love between two people is abhorrent. If it harms no-one, it’s none of my business. I am not entitled to an opinion and you shouldn’t be asking me for one. By asking me to make a judgement, you are making me a judge where I have no right to be one. In politics I may seek to uphold the fabric of society, and LGBTQ people are not – with their loving relationships – giving me any cause for concern. In fact, some of them are making a better go of marriage and community cohesion than some of the straight people.

What Tim Farron Should Have Said on Falcondale Life blog. This Christian Leader of the Liberal Democrats was asked if gay sex was wrong and he didn't give a very convincing answer. It's a very hard question because any answer will upset someone. But there's no need for him to judge. In fact that would be unwise. Opinions are one thing, judgement is another. And I think he knows Love Wins. This is a picture of the monument to William Tyndale at North Nibley. He translated the Bible into English and was matyred for it.

Monument to William Tyndale who was martyred for translating the Bible into English.

Marginalised

“I am also not going to judge the people who declare gay sex to be wrong. I’m not going to pile judgement upon judgement. Neither should you. Now these people are beginning to be marginalised, and Jesus has great compassion for marginalised people, regardless of what ideas they have in their heads.

“We all say that God will judge but He’s not keen on the possible outcome of that judgement because He’s perfect and we are not. Any outcome that sends us away from him breaks His heart. That’s why He’s sent Jesus to redeem us. So there’s even less point in being judgmental. God has already done something to save people on all sides of the argument. Let’s just accept that and stop feeling entitled to think that our own opinion on gay sex counts.

What Tim Farron Should Have Said on Falcondale Life blog. This Christian Leader of the Liberal Democrats was asked if gay sex was wrong and he didn't give a very convincing answer. It's a very hard question because any answer will upset someone. But there's no need for him to judge. In fact that would be unwise. Opinions are one thing, judgement is another. And I think he knows Love Wins. This picture is Fontevraud Abbey in the Loire Valley.

Alpha and Omega at Fontevraud Abbey.

Opinion

“Having said that it is very hard not to have an opinion. It’s hard not to think over the issues and wonder what is God’s heart. I would never discourage anyone from thinking it through, praying about it, studying the Bible together and seeking the truth. Doing this earnestly will change you in ways you are not expecting. Don’t forget, Christians are called to serve the people they like the least. If you want to accuse me of being counter-cultural, just try to imagine doing that.

“Having an opinion is not the same as judging. I may have a strong opinion on many issues but I can deliver my views and policies without seeking to send any human to condemnation. I won’t make excuses for people in the wrong, but I won’t treat them like I’ve never also been in the wrong. It’s so important to remember that nobody’s perfect; we should all be humbled by that.

“But saying “gay sex is wrong” or “not wrong” isn’t an opinion: it’s a judgement. There’s no softening that. So the answer to your question is no, I, Tim Farron, have no judgement to offer. And my opinion is that love wins.”

Disclaimer:

For what it’s worth I, Janet, the author of this blog admit to being very judge-y. For which I am sorry. Writing this is unlikely to stop me entirely but it might help a bit.

I don’t often blog about Christian faith, but sometimes it just happens. Read another by clicking here.

#20 in the Judging a Photograph Series

.How to Fake it as an Interiors Photographer on Falcondale Life blog. Temple Newsam House in Leeds has stunning interiors. If you have an everyday camera and half a clue how to use it, then use these tips to take a great interiors shot. How to compose a good shot and pick the right camera settings. What kind of shots can you take if you haven't got all the best equipment?

Professional interiors photographers often don’t get the credit they deserve. After all, a successful interiors image looks serene, even toned and un-dramatic. The skill that goes into making shot like this is not obvious. These photographers prefer natural light and a large depth of field from a small aperture so they will probably use a tripod. Their lens will be a wide angle – but not too wide like an estate agent. They may use a polarising filter to eliminate reflections. Their shots may be HDR to deal with the dark corners and bright windows. They may use coloured gels and massive lamps outside the window to fake good weather.

One photographer I know has a case full of flash guns and near magical skill in clamping them in unobtrusive corners to even the light with tiny pulses and reflectors. This allows him to include models in the shot without using HDR.

Duh …. What? Skip to this paragraph

If I’ve lost you a bit with all that technical guff, then skip to this paragraph, because now I’m going to show you how to fake it. What kind of shots can you get if you haven’t got all the right equipment? Let’s assume you’ve got your everyday camera, half a clue how to use it and no tripod or flashgun. You want to take an interiors shot that shows you have a great eye for photography.

As examples, I’m using pictures of the interior of Temple Newsam house near Leeds.

Step 1 – don’t take just any shot.

You have to accept there are some shots you simply can’t do. Avoid awkward reflective surfaces. Avoid high contrast near a window on a sunny day. This shot below is an example of this problem. The degree of contrast is far too high. The solution here may be to stand with the window behind you. Or come back on a cloudy day, at a time when the sun is on the other side of the building. Or just find something else to shoot!

How to Fake it as an Interiors Photographer on Falcondale Life blog. Temple Newsam House in Leeds has stunning interiors. If you have an everyday camera and half a clue how to use it, then use these tips to take a great interiors shot. How to compose a good shot and pick the right camera settings. What kind of shots can you take if you haven't got all the best equipment? Contrast is too high, this photo will not work.

The contrast is too great between the shadows and bright areas.

Step 2 – compose your shot

The two main things to remember here are lines and height. Interiors tend to have rigid lines and corners. Get your horizons straight and try to finish diagonal lines neatly in the corners of the frame. Try to allow space for an imaginary person to move through or sit the room. This is where the magic happens; people do imagine themselves in interiors shots and this can really sell it.

Then for height, hold your camera lower down between waist and chest height. You can see from the image below that if the camera is too high then we look down onto chair seats in the foreground as if we are high up, but in the background the bed looks more like a normal height. Vertical lines in the room are leaning. It’s visually confusing.

How to Fake it as an Interiors Photographer on Falcondale Life blog. Temple Newsam House in Leeds has stunning interiors. If you have an everyday camera and half a clue how to use it, then use these tips to take a great interiors shot. How to compose a good shot and pick the right camera settings. What kind of shots can you take if you haven't got all the best equipment? This shot has the wrong perspective, hold the camera lower.

The perspective is wrong because the camera is held too high up.

Step 3 – pick your settings

Use a wide angle but keep the edges of your photo looking realistic and not stretched. Set your ISO to a high number and don’t leave it on automatic. Set your aperture to something fairly small, ideally at least f/8. Your shutter speed should be set as low as your steady hands allow. The wide angle should help you here. Different people have different levels of hand steadiness; I can shoot hand-held at a 50th on a wide angle. Shoot RAW not jpeg if you have that ability. Take a test shot.

Step 4 – adjust your settings

If your test shot is too dark, then open up your aperture. Don’t set your shutter speed any slower or you will get movement blur from your shaking hands. Focus one third of the distance into your picture to try to keep it all sharp. If the shot is too bright then turn down your ISO and increase your shutter speed. Either way you do not need a perfect exposure. If you are shooting RAW then you can be almost 2 stops under or over-exposed and you will still be able to salvage your shot when you edit. Best to get it as close as you can, though.

Step 5 – fix it in post

I mean, edit it on your computer! Improve the exposure and white balance. Reduce contrast, brighten shadows then add some sharpening. Deal with any wonky horizons when you crop.

How to Fake it as an Interiors Photographer on Falcondale Life blog. Temple Newsam House in Leeds has stunning interiors. If you have an everyday camera and half a clue how to use it, then use these tips to take a great interiors shot. How to compose a good shot and pick the right camera settings. What kind of shots can you take if you haven't got all the best equipment?

I am pleased with this shot of the ballroom at Temple Newsam. The advantage of this room is its huge size meaning that the perspective was never too stretched. Also the windows spaced out at intervals give pretty even lighting except on the very far left. The lines in the ceiling and floor make it easy for me to compose the shot. Despite this the contrast was high and the shadows were dark so I did everything I mentioned in step 5 above!

Have you got any more tips to add? Please comment below!

If you want to get more into interiors photography and fake it less, these two blogs are great reading: DanD and Suzie Pratt for LifePixel

Read the previous blog in the Judging a Photograph Series by clicking here.

Read the Judging a Photograph Series from the start by clicking here.

Photalife