#26 in the Judging a Photograph Series . Cropping is pretty much the most basic photo editing action, but there’s a lot you can do to an image. If you’re a regular reader of my blog then you will know that I rarely leave my photos alone SOOC (straight out of camera). In my view photography isn’t just the bit where I click the shutter, it’s also the vision I have for the finished image. Sometimes I have that vision when I take the photo, sometimes I come up with an idea later when I see it on the computer.…

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#24 in the Judging a Photograph Series . Last week in the “Judging a Photograph” blog series I talked about choosing when adding a presets or filters to a photo. I find that it only really works on simplistic images. Any photo with complex appeal is usually ruined by a filter, especially the fairly brutal Instagram ones. However I did also say there are exceptions and this photo of a peacock is the most striking one of mine. Why Use Filters Now? Now I know what you’re going to say; you’re going to say you prefer the original version in…

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#23 in the Judging a Photograph Series . Sometimes I wonder why so many of us put a filter on our photos before posting online. We scroll through apps like Instagram searching for the best filter without really knowing if other people will like it. A popular Instagram filter might increase engagement. On the other had it might have the effect of making it look the same as everyone else’s picture, and then it doesn’t stand out. General Editing Tips The best advice I can offer is to practice small adjustments with all the editing tools that you have to…

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#20 in the Judging a Photograph Series . Professional interiors photographers often don’t get the credit they deserve. After all, a successful interiors image looks serene, even toned and un-dramatic. The skill that goes into making shot like this is not obvious. These photographers prefer natural light and a large depth of field from a small aperture so they will probably use a tripod. Their lens will be a wide angle – but not too wide like an estate agent. They may use a polarising filter to eliminate reflections. Their shots may be HDR to deal with the dark corners…

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#19 in the Judging a Photograph Series Last week I mentioned that chicken wire is the bane of my life when it comes to taking animal portraits. I no longer have any pets so it’s zoos and farm parks for me, and they all have wire fences making photos tricky. Things look easier in the Tropical house or Hothouse display where a clear sheet of glass is all that is in the way. There are still some problems to overcome. It’s very dark The glass shows reflections and glare The animals are hiding Short of chatting up a keeper for a bit…

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