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Photos from a Camera Obscura

A visit to a camera obscura at Bristol or Lacock is fun to do as a family. How it works, what you will see and tips for trying to take photos of the views. Scientific and cultural interest for families on a UK day out. Photos from a Camera Obscura on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Clifton suspension bridge and Lacock Abbey seen through a camera obscura plus blog title.A camera obscura is a dark room or box with a pinhole. The light coming through the pinhole projects the image of the outdoors onto the opposite wall. It really is that simple. This technique has existed for millennia and was first written down in the 4th century BC. In recent centuries the experience has been improved with lenses, levers and ratchets to focus and move the image.

Going to see a camera obscura is a nice cultural outing with children. It’s always a brief visit but very interesting science. They are always in historic locations with a bit of a story too. It’s fun to shut yourself in a dark room and peer at the people unsuspecting people outside. It is like being inside a camera, and to me that is quite magical.

Camera Obscura in Clifton, Bristol

We’ve been to two camera obscuras in recent years. There is one housed in its own tower on Clifton Down in Bristol, just yards from Clifton Suspension bridge. In recent years it has been restored and is maintained by volunteers. There are quite a lot of winding steps to the top. In the centre of the circular room at the top there is a concave white surface. The image of the outdoors is focused on this surface. Using a handle, you can move the lens to look all around Bristol, watching people walk in far away streets.

A visit to a camera obscura at Bristol or Lacock is fun to do as a family. How it works, what you will see and tips for trying to take photos of the views. Scientific and cultural interest for families on a UK day out. Photos from a Camera Obscura on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Clifton suspension bridge seen through the camera obscura on Clifton Down.Camera Obscura at Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire

I’ve previously written about Lacock Abbey where photography was invented. Here, visitors can see a camera obscura housed in a humble shed (or it may be a shepherd’s hut). This is a much simpler affair with just one view down the path alongside the stately home. The story here is that Fox Talbot greatly desired to be able to draw, but he had no talent. He tried using various projectors and a camera obscura to improve his skills but in the long run he invented photography instead. The rest, as they say, is history.

A visit to a camera obscura at Bristol or Lacock is fun to do as a family. How it works, what you will see and tips for trying to take photos of the views. Scientific and cultural interest for families on a UK day out. Photos from a Camera Obscura on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Lacock abbey seen through a camera obscura.Taking photos in a Camera Obscura – Tips

By nature it’s very dark inside a camera obscura and photos will probably be shaky. At peak times people will keep coming in and out and opening the door which ruins the light. It’s also cramped and you can’t take in a tripod unless you are able to arrange a special visit with the owners.

  • Shoot manual mode and use manual focus as well
  • Turn your ISO up as high as it will go
  • Open your aperture as wide as possible but only if you can shoot straight on at the image. If you’re shooting at an angle across the surface you will need to stop down to about f4
  • Use a shutter speed of 1/50 or if you have steady hands try 1/40
  • Brace your body and especially your elbows on the bench or wall
  • Accept that your photo is going to be quite a dark one. Don’t aim to achieve a normal exposure.
  • You could use a monopod for a couple of extra stops.
  • If you can put the camera down on a seat then you can use a much longer exposure such as 1/8 or much longer, and perhaps turn your ISO down.

Have you ever visited a camera obscura? I’d love to know where there are more to visit so please comment below or tweet or email me.

More views near Bristol in “How to find meaning in Father’s day“. More sky-gazing and long exposure photography tips in “Dark Sky Drives – Seeing Stars with the Family

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Things to Consider When Your Teen or Tween Wants Hair Dye

Is it safe to dye children's hair, and should parents agree to it? When your teen or tween wants hair dye here are points about safety and school rules. Things to consider when your teen or tween wants hair dye on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: child having hair dip dye with kool aid plus blog title.Collaborative Post

It’s a natural part of growing up for young girls to want to copy adults in the way they do their makeup or hair. Dying hair has more impact then simply adding a swipe of lipstick or eyeliner. Unlike her experiments with make-up, your daughter can’t just wipe hair dye off at the end of the day. This needs more thought.

Safety Risks when your tween wants hair dye

In fact, most hair dye is not thought to be safe for children. Hair dye manufacturers provide a clear age limit of 16 on their salon products. If you look at home dye kits, they may contain PPD and also have an age 16 limit. I have read articles describing risks including rashes, asthma and allergic reactions. The risk of a reaction leading to female hair loss at a young age would worry me.

Is it safe to dye children's hair, and should parents agree to it? When your teen or tween wants hair dye here are points about safety and school rules. Things to consider when your teen or tween wants hair dye on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: child with dip dye hairShould a parent agree to hair colour?

Fashions in hair colour are pretty bold these days. Strong reds, purples, blues and even grey are in vogue. My own reluctance to say yes if my tween wants hair dye is partly cultural. Times change. When my grandmother was young, any woman who painted her nails was thought to be “fast”. Now we paint our toddler’s toenails for fun.

Even so there are school rules to consider. Nail colour, obvious make-up and hair colour are all forbidden at my child’s secondary school. This does perpetuate a feeling of rebelliousness and freedom when the holidays come round and the nail art comes out of the cupboard.

Because the school ban these things, when my tween wants hair dye or makeup then I don’t have to make a rule that is different to other parents. That really makes life easier for me.

Is it safe to dye children's hair, and should parents agree to it? When your teen or tween wants hair dye here are points about safety and school rules. Things to consider when your teen or tween wants hair dye on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: child having hair dip dye with kool aid

Our Kool Aid Hair Dye Adventure

Provided it’s the school holidays, and provided it is safe, I think I’m happy to agree if my tween wants hair dye. But how to do it safely?

Last summer while visiting family in New York State, my sister-in-law introduced us to Kool-Aid hair dye. Kool-Aid is not true hair dye at all; it is supposed to be a drink similar to squash. It is a powdered solution which you add to water. It’s just food colouring and flavours. The colours are pretty wild and in fact several contain e-numbers which are banned in Europe! They are legal in America and I hope most people suffer no ill effects.

Is it safe to dye children's hair, and should parents agree to it? When your teen or tween wants hair dye here are points about safety and school rules. Things to consider when your teen or tween wants hair dye on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: child with hair dip dye with kool aidMy sister-in-law has no plans to feed her children these additives in a drink but she discovered that you can use them as a temporary hair colourant. It’s just food, so I’m happy that it’s going to be safe on hair.

Belle and her cousin V were 12 and 11 years old and had tremendous fun getting their hair dip-dyed in various Kool Aid colours. V’s hair is light blonde and took up the colours really well until she had quite a rainbow of dip-dye. It was all new to me so I was more cautious and just let Belle dip dye the very ends.

Washing out Kool Aid

According to instructions we found on the internet, Kool Aid hair colour should wash out in a couple of weeks. It was a good thing I was cautious because it did not wash out, and I had to get Belle a haircut before school started.

Is it safe to dye children's hair, and should parents agree to it? When your teen or tween wants hair dye here are points about safety and school rules. Things to consider when your teen or tween wants hair dye on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: child having hair dip dye with kool aidWe brought home lots of Kool Aid sachets and at Christmas we dip-dyed Belle’s hair again. This time we just dipped the underneath layer of hair for five minutes. We used a dark red colour. I thought if it didn’t wash out again then it would at least be hidden under her natural hair for school.

Six months later, the colour has faded but it has not washed out! The internet has suggestions of using bicarb of soda to get it out but that sounds quite abrasive and I think it’s better to leave it. The red tone looks almost natural now.

Temporary Hair Dyeing Tips

As the colour sticks so well, I would only ever use it for dip-dye. I fear it would stain skin if we tried to do it all the way to the roots. Next time we will try just 3 minutes of soaking, and with luck it will come out more easily.

Is it safe to dye children's hair, and should parents agree to it? When your teen or tween wants hair dye here are points about safety and school rules. Things to consider when your teen or tween wants hair dye on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: pan of kool aidEach sachet of Kool Aid cost just 12 cents and makes 4 pints of squash, or half a pint for hair dye. It is ridiculously cheap, so if you know anyone going to America then why not ask them to visit the squash aisle of the supermarket? There are loads of instruction pages and videos on the internet.

If your teen or tween wants hair dye to try, I have researched a UK alternative. You can get wash-in wash-out hair gel called Manic Panic which has no lower age limit and no PPD. Here is my affiliate link for Manic Panic on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2Hs0uJ8 The manufacturer still advises a patch test (and that’s a wise idea with Kool Aid too).

How do you feel about hair colour on children?

Related reading on this blog: Should I let my child wear make-up?

NB. This is my story and not advice, please follow manufacturer’s instructions on all products.

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Photography in Auto Mode Part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure

Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: River Nidd at Knaresborough and Ripon from the river, plus blog title.If you’re using your camera on auto mode then you can still learn a great deal about light and good exposures. You can also control it and use it for creative effect and better quality images.

In the previous blog post in this series I discussed what is a good exposure. Now you know what you want your photo to look like, how do you get control over that in auto mode?

How does your auto mode camera guess the exposure?

In auto mode most cameras will try to set an average exposure for the dominant part of the image. It will ignore small areas of very bright or very dark – whether you want it to or not. The camera will take an average from the biggest area of the photo. If most of your image is medium brightness, then this might work out just fine. But if you have got bright sun or high contrast, then it could easily go wrong. That’s why the baby’s face is in darkness in the photo example below.

Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: baby on the beach, face in shadow.Try half pressing the button or tapping the screen

On DSLR, compact or bridge camera you can usually half-press the shutter button to see what your camera is going to do. The camera may draw a box around the area of the photo it thinks is most important. Chances are the camera will use these areas for exposure as well as focus.

On a phone you can tap the screen to select the part of the photo where you want it to focus and expose. You can take some test shots and see which part of the image gives you the best exposure, and which part has not turned out so well.

Taking test shots to find the best exposure

These two photos below are taken moments apart but one has exposed for the buildings and the other for the sky. I think they are both failures. There are only very bright and very dark areas and it is all high contrast. There is no area of medium brightness.

Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Ripon cathedral and river, wrong exposure.Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Ripon Cathedral and river, in silhouetteWhat can you do in this situation? Perhaps take a different photo altogether. You could change your composition to leave out most of the sky or leave out the foreground. Alternatively shoot in RAW and see if you can rescue it in Lightroom, which requires a whole other set of skills!

Take back some control on a bright day

If you are not getting what you want, your best option is to move the camera, and probably your feet as well.

To get the best exposure photo of the baby, I moved around so the sun was behind me. I took her hat off for a moment so there was light her face. Of course that means she is squinting a bit in the brightness.

Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: baby on the beach squinting in the sun.So next I moved around again so the sun was off to the side. There is a shadow across her face but it’s only slight. The whole photo has quite an even tone because I have avoided getting the bright sky in the shot. There’s little contrast in the background, which makes life easy.

Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Baby on the beach, side light.A good exposure for landscape shots

One last example is this shot of a river and autumn trees. The river on the left and the trees on the right are almost black. The central water and sky are very bright but there is a big area of trees near the middle which are a medium tone. It’s these trees which make the exposure successful. I exposed for the trees, and the whole photo turned out well.

Getting the right exposure when your camera is in auto mode can be hit or miss. Get some control and pick the right area of your photo for the best exposure. Do you know what you need to expose for? Learn how to guarantee the best exposure. Tips for every kind of camera or phone. Photography in Auto Mode part 6: How to Choose the Best Exposure on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: River Nidd at KnaresboroughSummary

Select the right area of a photo to set the best exposure. Especially for portraits, make sure that your subject is not one of the very darkest or very brightest areas of the shot. Move your photoshoot to an area with even, medium light.

For a landscape you may need to make a feature of the land and leave the sky too bright (“blown out”), or make a feature of the sky and leave the land in darkness.

If you have any questions please get in touch or leave a comment below. I do read them all.

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More Spring Flower Shots and Why Editing Photos is Important

These spring flower photos did not need much editing in Lightroom but I am a firm believer in post production. Photos have needed developing ever since the invention of photography. Editing photos is a basic essential but it can be taken further and I can show you how it is a well-established art form. Spring Flower Photos and Why Editing is Important on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Pink tulip and fluffy pasque flowers backlit by sun plus blog title wording.Last week I shared some of my photos from my in-law’s lovely garden, with the low sun streaming through from behind. I have a few more to share today from the same place. On Instagram and Facebook this week these photos got a lot of interaction, which is lovely.

Flower photos and how they were shot

This tulip was on its last gasp of glory, with ageing curled petals balanced, about to fall at any moment. There is still something quite solid and definite about a tulip even at the end of its life. Those petals are not delicate; I feel I could use one as a small plate!

These spring flower photos did not need much editing in Lightroom but I am a firm believer in post production. Photos have needed developing ever since the invention of photography. Editing photos is a basic essential but it can be taken further and I can show you how it is a well-established art form. Spring Flower Photos and Why Editing is Important on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Pink tulip just before it goes over.Here the composition needed some thought. When I took this photo I was concerned that the pattern of light on the grass in the background would be distracting. I’ve managed to position it so the light makes a wide arc over the top of the bloom.

These fluffballs catch the light so well, and several people have asked me for the name. They are Pasque flowers and are growing in a very well drained position, in a narrow border gap built into a brick wall. I love them but they would just drown in my boggy garden. I mentioned last week that I have photographed them before in bud stage and the shot featured in my blog post “When Perfect Isn’t Good Enough“.

These spring flower photos did not need much editing in Lightroom but I am a firm believer in post production. Photos have needed developing ever since the invention of photography. Editing photos is a basic essential but it can be taken further and I can show you how it is a well-established art form. Spring Flower Photos and Why Editing is Important on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Pasque flowers looking like balls of fluff.It’s not a very well composed photo as I could barely see what I was shooting thanks to the sun in my face and reflecting off my viewscreen. Next time I’ll take my DSLR so I can use the viewfinder and block out the glare. I think it works as a scruffy composition because the flowers are kind of scruffy.

A Word About Editing Photos – My View

Both of the above photos were slightly edited in Lightroom to correct the white balance and contrast. I am a firm believer in post production as photos have needed developing ever since the invention of photography. If you are old enough to remember letting the Saturday girl behind the counter in Boots develop your colour films, I can assure you that she too adjusted your exposure and white balance. When I hear someone say that photos ought not to be edited it really does make my blood boil!

The late Terry Cryer was one of our country’s top film photographers and a true authority on photo post-production. He certainly edited his film in a highly creative way and he was only working in black and white. He did more than most people in the dark-room and turned it into an art form. You can read more about him in this tribute. Clearly editing photos is a well-established creative expression, and does not exist just to fake it.

These spring flower photos did not need much editing in Lightroom but I am a firm believer in post production. Photos have needed developing ever since the invention of photography. Editing photos is a basic essential but it can be taken further and I can show you how it is a well-established art form. Spring Flower Photos and Why Editing is Important on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Sunlight through colourful leaves and shrubs in spring.A touch of Artistic Licence

So here, lastly, is one more shot of the light coming through the trees in my in-law’s garden. It’s a similar photo to the one I published on the blog last week but here I’ve taken the clarity down in Lightroom. It already had a slightly dreamy effect but reducing the clarity emphasized that. As the dreamy feel was central to the expression in this image, I really didn’t want it to be lost. I think emphasizing it was entirely justified.

Have I convinced you with my views on editing photos? Let me know your thoughts in the comments or through social media.

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These spring flower photos did not need much editing in Lightroom but I am a firm believer in post production. Photos have needed developing ever since the invention of photography. Editing photos is a basic essential but it can be taken further and I can show you how it is a well-established art form. Spring Flower Photos and Why Editing is Important on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: Pink tulip and fluffy pasque flowers backlit by sun plus blog title wording.
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Spring Flower Photos in Low Sun – Pic of the Week

When you can't get out much, perhaps there's a chance to take some Spring flower photos in the garden of a friend or neighbour. Here's how I used low sun for some beautiful lighting effects with photography tips to try. Spring flower photos in low sun on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: sun shining though aqualegia flowers.It may seem funny but even though I am a family travel and photography blogger I have not been able to get out of the house much this whole year. I had surgery on my big toe which has limited my walking a great deal. Since March Fizz has been getting stuck into her GCSE revision which means we can’t go on holiday. If you follow me on Instagram you will know that recently Belle has been quite ill. That has dragged on for over a month. I am really getting to know my four walls!

Thankfully I have plenty of travel experiences and photos which I have still not got onto the blog. In fact I have so many I wonder if I will ever manage it all.

When you can't get out much, perhaps there's a chance to take some Spring flower photos in the garden of a friend or neighbour. Here's how I used low sun for some beautiful lighting effects with photography tips to try. Spring flower photos in low sun on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: sun shining through trees and foliage.A Garden for Flower Photos

To get outdoors for a change of scene, I am always grateful at this time of year to be able to visit my in-laws garden. It’s just a twenty minute drive away. Not only is there always a cup of tea and a biscuit on offer, but their award-winning garden is abundant in Spring flowers. This is where I shot my pasque flower photo which won me my first photography trophy. The sun sets low across the garden and the light shines through petals and leaves.

When you can't get out much, perhaps there's a chance to take some Spring flower photos in the garden of a friend or neighbour. Here's how I used low sun for some beautiful lighting effects with photography tips to try. Spring flower photos in low sun on Falcondale Life blog. Image description: sun shining though aqualegia flowers.Camera settings and tips

I took these photos with my Sony compact which shoots high quality RAW images. The only disadvantage is that in dazzling sun the viewfinder shape is not adequate to block out glare from around my eye. With my DSLR I could have got my eye closer and better protected from glare. So with the Sony I couldn’t entirely see what I was shooting. I’ve done this enough times before to be able to get some nice pictures but it was not a precise exercise.

As it was broad sunlight, I set the ISO quite low (I think I left it on 200) and used the P setting to dial the aperture quite wide. To get nice bokeh you need the aperture wide but to get sharp sunbeams you need the aperture small. It’s a compromise. I used f4. That ISO and aperture gave me a really fast shutter speed which made life easy.

Who can resist taking flower photos? Do you have a favourite that you have taken, and how did you achieve the shot? Let me know in the comments.

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