Tips for Making Frames Within Photographs

#22 in the Judging a Photograph Series

.Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

It’s always nice to find new ideas for making photos more interesting. I do love to use frames in an image. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. This might be a tree trunk or a wall or just a dark shadow. The idea is that when someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge.

Finding Frames in Knaresborough

Knaresborough in North Yorkshire has a railway viaduct with views through the arches to charming cottages ranged up the side of the gorge. The whole town is a photographer’s paradise. There’s a castle, a river, rowing boats, a marketplace, old bridges, little snickets and cobbled alleyways, ancient architecture and rustic pubs. For photographers the main advantage is the gorge. It gives such lot of choices of different heights and angles for photos.

These photos are taken from the Mother Shipton side of the river Nidd. In June the cottages just peep out from among the willows and ivy in full leaf.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

I tried to capture this green view first of all. In the first picture above, just the edge of the arch and the dangling ivy make a soft frame. The contrast is quite low which means there is not much impression of depth.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

In this second image I used the hard frame of one arch around the whole image. It’s more striking. The sky is nice and blue because the centre of the photo is exposed correctly. It works well in black and white too, but for that I did choose to lighten the stonework. If I hadn’t, there would have been too much black overall.

Notice the little band of light across the grass in the foreground. It’s quite effective, like an underline.

I did wonder whether to brighten up the exposure to show the stonework texture of the arch, but as you can see from the shot below, it doesn’t work. It’s washed out, especially the sky. The feeling of depth is lost too. I’ve got further tips about exposing the sky – click here.

Tips for Making Frames within Photos on Falcondale Life blog. A frame is something within the photo that holds the edges. We “read” images just the same way we read text, i.e. left to right. That means it’s a good idea to give a bit of thought to edges. Think especially about the right hand edge of the photo. Many photographers like to put something dark at the very edge like a full stop. When someone looks at the image, their eye is held within it and doesn’t slide off the edge. The high contrast can be a challenge. Knaresborough viaduct, North Yorkshire.

Challenging Contrast

Contrast is usually the big decision when using something in an image to make a frame. Your framing object will probably be the darkest part of the image. It would be easiest to get the rest of the image exposed correctly and then the frame can be as dark as you like. If you like the frame itself and expose for that, then you would have to accept that the remainder of the image will perhaps become washed out.

What have you used to make frames in photos, and did you like the effect? Let me know in the comments below.

Read the previous blog in the Judging a Photograph series by clicking here.

Read the Judging a Photograph series from the start by clicking here.

Photalife

 

21 Comments

  1. 28th June 2017 / 8:52 pm

    I struggle with framing, it never seems to turn out right for me, so this was really helpful

  2. 28th June 2017 / 7:40 am

    Thank so much for explaining this, I have taken photos with frames before but never ended up using them because of the washed out effect. Although I do think the black and white option is one I am going to explore more.

    • 28th June 2017 / 1:35 pm

      Glad it helped! I edit everything. There’s a lot that can be brought back from a slightly bad exposure, but not always.

  3. 27th June 2017 / 5:55 pm

    I love how the eye is drawn around this image. #MySundayPhoto

  4. Sarah Ann
    27th June 2017 / 1:45 am

    I like your photos and the tips you provide. I’m still a complete novice and find these really helpful.

  5. I too like adding frames to photos, as it adds depth to the picture, as well as stopping the eye from sliding off. I’m often stuck though between exposing for the subject, or for the frame. The latter often ends up so dark, all detail is lost. I will try and remember these great tips, thanks for sharing!
    #MySundayPhoto

  6. Helen
    25th June 2017 / 9:40 pm

    Such interesting tips – I’ve learnt a lot, thank you!

  7. 25th June 2017 / 9:18 pm

    Fantastic tips as ever, I love that you share your talent! Thank you!

  8. 25th June 2017 / 8:46 pm

    These are gorgeous photos. I’ve never actually been to Knaresborough but it looks beautiful so I think I may need to investigate x

    • 26th June 2017 / 7:28 am

      Mother Shiptons cave is worth ticking off your bucket list on a summer’s day x

  9. 25th June 2017 / 8:39 pm

    Some fab tips, adding frames within photos really does give it a little extra texture! #MySundayPhoto.

  10. 25th June 2017 / 8:36 pm

    I really like the way you explain all of this as if it were a sentence, it’s a really handy way to remember things. Beautiful photos too!

    • 26th June 2017 / 7:30 am

      I guess that’s the way my brain works, I’m glad you like it! Thanks.

  11. 25th June 2017 / 4:15 pm

    I love using various things to frame pictures, it can transform the photo

    Thank you for linking up

  12. 25th June 2017 / 3:00 pm

    I love the framing from the whole arch, but also like the half-frame one. I’ve used frames before and it can sometimes be hard to decide which to expose for. Nine times out of ten I am interested in what’s in the frame rather than the frame itself so for that I make sure the subject is exposed correctly. #mysundayphoto

    • 25th June 2017 / 3:47 pm

      Yes, sometimes I expose for light area but it ruins the whole photo. Then I have to expose for the dark area and it’s a completely different photo!

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